Feminism vs. Meninism

Published May 6, 2015 by marsass

A great stand point on one of the main topics circulating around right now; some interpret it as irony, some take it more seriously and some actually believe in it, written by one of my good friends whom of which is an amazing author!

geez

As a current topic, previously discussed in many social media posts and spread of word in real life, there has been some sort of controversy between the two subjects; feminism and “meninism”. I only put quotations to signify that it isn’t a real word. Even spell-check gives it that little, red squiggly line where it doesn’t know how to change it to even look right. The irony.

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Farming 101

Published April 23, 2015 by marsass

I’ve recently picked up a new book, Of Mice and Men, and I can say it is unlike most books I’ve read as of late. Most stories require research to fully understand them, but this particular novella not only makes you look into it but think about your daily life more and how you go about things. Our society is a very stop and go society. You go to the store, you buy what you want whether it be fruits and vegetables or soda and chips, we don’t often see the work that goes into these things, we just know and expect them to be there. But what would happen if one day .  .  .

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The Sexual Objectification of Women

Published April 21, 2015 by marsass

I saw a video not too long ago about domestic abuse, Slap Her: Children’s Reactions, it promotes stopping domestic violence. The narrator asks a group of young boys a series of questions, such as their name, age, who they are, what they want to do and so on. Each boy was introduced and then asked if they thought a girl was pretty, if they would want to date her, to touch her and to hit her. The boys said she was pretty, said they would date her, they touched her but none said they would hit. But the thing is, the narrator never asked the girl her age, what she wanted to do or who she was. She was just the pretty girl. And not only there does the problem lay, when the narrator asked each child to touch her — they did. None of them asked for consent, they assumed their touch was a nice touch, as if the difference between stroking the girl or stroking an object with no preference had no difference.

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